Fall 2021 NYU Consortium Classes

 Last Updated: July 8, 2021

Courses are subject to changes and cancellations. For a PDF version of the courses with descriptions, please click here

Through the New York City Consortium for Latin American Studies, master's students from New York University and Columbia are allowed to take pre-approved courses each semester. These courses below are approved by the Institute of Latin American Studies for SIPA and MARSLAC students to cross-register in FALL 2021. These courses must be registered via a form on the first day of the class. Please see your instructor and follow the instructions on the registration form. Note that fall semester classes at NYU will start on Thursday, September 2 and end on Tuesday, December 14, 2021.

    Approved Consortium Classes at NYU

    LATC-GA 1014 – Comparative Racisms in the Americas
    Day/Time: Thursdays, 2:00pm – 4:30pm
    Prof. Pamela Calla
    Instruction Mode: In-Person
    Location: KJCC 404W

    This seminar will explore emergent forms of racism in the Americas as major obstacles to the construction of intercultural relations, racial and economic justice, and democracy. The emergence of these “new or renewed racisms” is still largely a relatively uncharted terrain in the social sciences. The course will thus explore this phenomenon as integral to the multicultural and what some have called “post racial” present defined by larger processes of economic and cultural globalization and transnational migration. Throughout the course, we will also look at these emergent racisms in relation to the challenges facing indigenous and afro-descendant social movements, middle class political networks, and state and non-governmental institutions that seek to deepen democracy in the hemisphere by building the basis for active citizenship and racial and economic justice. The following general questions will guide our analysis and discussion: What is the relationship between institutionalized racism, embedded in the fabric of these societies, and specific “racial eruptions,” which appear to stand in contrast to prevailing ideologies of pluralism and intercultural relations? How to explain the persistence of racial hierarchy in societies where powerful actors explicitly endorse principles of multicultural recognition and racial equality? Does government-endorsed multiculturalism mitigate the negative impact of extractive, industrial, informal and other economic activities on indigenous and afro-descendant peoples? Or alternatively, do these economies actually lay the groundwork for what could be considered a “racialized” economic order? How do the push and pull of migration tied to larger necessities of capital accumulation and labor exploitation shape the dynamics and logics of racism within the region? What types of constitutional reforms, legislative and public policy agendas have emerged to address these dynamics and logics?

     

    Queer Corporealities in Latin America: Imaginaries, Technologies, Politics
    Day/Time: Tuesday, 11:00am – 1:30pm
    Prof. Ana G. Alvarez
    Instruction Mode: In-Person
    Location: TBD

    In this course, we will analyze the transformations across the late twentieth and early twenty-first century, of embodied forms of queer identities, particularly travesti and Trans, in the Americas, as a way of problematizing wider constellations of affect, desire and consumption in the hemisphere as well as to inquire into the gendered dimensions of migration and transnational constellations of sexual citizenship. Trans subjectivities constitute a particularly rich prism through which to read this wider social and cultural arena, thanks to the exceptionally creative and accelerated ways in with which travesti and trans subjects and collectives have absorbed, resignified, and/or accentuated changes in biomedical technologies, shifts in familial and productive relations and their mass-media expressions, embodiments and fashion regimes. All of these, furthermore, also find a resonance chamber in the sex market at the same time as they trigger institutional as well as societal violence from prison regimes to “crimes of passion”. In reconstructing these changing imaginaries of dissident/transformative embodiments of sexuality and gender –from locas and maricas to travestis and trans persons– we shall begin by analyzing some historically and geographically specific articulations of queerness from colonial to high-modern Latin America, before zooming in on contemporary legal and biopolitical reconfigurations of gender identity as well as on the interrelations of these with trans-American migrations and broader questions of citizenship and precarization as well as the emergence of new biomedical and pharmacological technologies that facilitate a more diverse and fleeting range of transitional genders.

    Latin American and Caribbean Geographies of Knowledge
    Day/Time: Tuesdays, 2:00pm – 4:30pm        
    Prof. Dylon Robbins
    Instruction Mode: In-Person
    Location: TDB

    In this course, we will take an interdisciplinary and multi-media approach to intellectual history in Latin America and the Caribbean. How have Latin American and Caribbean intellectuals, artists, and activists approached the problems of culture and difference?  How have they theorized the state, civil society, the public sphere, borders, violence, and belonging? How have notions of gender, heterogeneity, race and ethnicity, and nationalism related to their historical contexts and involved unique understandings of the body, sensorial experience, and perception? How does their work involve challenges to the frequently monolingual and imperial geographies of knowledge production? We will read and discuss a selection of works by Lélia Gonzalez, Sayak Valencia, Sillvia Rivera Cusicanqui, Gilberto Freyre, Marilena Chaui, Fernando Ortiz, Suely Rolnik, Roberto Schwarz, Ángel Rama, Ailton Krenak, C.L.R. James, Frantz Fanon, Suazanne Césaire, Glauber Rocha, Gloria Anzaldúa, José Carlos Mariátegui, and others. 

    LATC-GA 1014-002 Critical Race Theory: Intellectual Histories and Social Practice (same as ANTH-GA 1253-001)
    Day/Time: Mondays, 4:55pm – 7:25pm
    Prof. Aisha Khan
    Instructor Mode: In-person
    Location: TDB

    This seminar explores emergent forms of racism in the Americas and considers their impact on intercultural relations, racial and economic justice, and democracy. The emergence of these “new racisms” is largely uncharted terrain in the social sciences; we explore this phenomenon in relation to what some have called a “post-racial” present defined by larger processes of economic and cultural globalization and transnational migration.

     

    LATC-GA 10 - Elementary Quechua I
    Date/time: Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 9:30 am  - 10:45 am
    Instruction Mode: In-person
    Instructor: Odi Gonzalez
    Location: TDB

    Quechua is the most important and most widely distributed indigenous language in South America, with about 10 million speakers living from the high mountains to the tropical lowlands in Colombia (where the language is called Ingano), Ecuador (where it is called kichwa or runa shimi, "human speech"), Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina (where it is usually spelled Quechua and called, by its speakers, runa simi). Studying Quechua opens a window onto alternative ways of thinking about social worlds, about space and time, family, and humans' relationship with the natural world. Quechua is recommended for students anticipating travel to the Andean region, those interested in language and linguistics, and those interested in indigenous literatures and cultures. Students who satisfactorily complete introductory Quechua will be well-prepared for intensive summer study at one of many summer study abroad programs in Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia that will put them in closer contact with the indigenous world.

    LATC-GA 21 - Intermediate Quechua I
    Day/Time:  Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 2:00pm – 3:15pm
    Instruction Mode: In-person
    Prof. Odi Gonzales
    Location: TBD

    Quechua is the most important and most widely distributed indigenous language in South America, with about 10 million speakers living from the high mountains to the tropical lowlands in Colombia (where the language is called Ingano), Ecuador (where it is called kichwa or runa shimi, "human speech"), Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina (where it is usually spelled Quechua and called, by its speakers, runa simi). Studying Quechua opens a window onto alternative ways of thinking about social worlds, about space and time, family, and humans' relationship with the natural world. Quechua is recommended for students anticipating travel to the Andean region, those interested in language and linguistics, and those interested in indigenous literatures and cultures. Students who satisfactorily complete introductory Quechua will be well-prepared for intensive summer study at one of many summer study abroad programs in Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia that will put them in closer contact with the indigenous world.

    How to Register

    1. Read the detailed list of approved courses and select a course.
    2. Contact Eliza Kwon-Ahn at ILAS with any questions on Columbia administrative matters.
    3. If necessary, contact the CLACS Office at NYU for instructions on completing administrative matters there:

      Gabriel Mangraner, Program Administrator
      NYU/CLACS
      King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center (KJCC)
      53 Washington Square South, Floor 4W
      212-998-8687
       
    4. Download and print the CU-NYU Cross Registration Form.
    5. Complete and sign the form, and make two copies of it.
    6. Keep one copy for your records, and hand in the other at the Office of the Registrar in 205 Kent Hall.

    Important Details

    • Registration is manual, and you will need to attend the first day of the class at NYU to obtain all the required signatures.
       
    • The fall 2021 semester at NYU will start on Thursday, September 2.
       
    • The ILAS-CLACS consortium agreement is only for students in MARSLAC and SIPA program.  Students in other programs at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences are not eligible to register for these courses. Students at other schools must consult their school policies.